Members

Prof Neil Walsh FACSM (Director)

Neil studied Sports Science at Manchester Metropolitan University (BSc) and Loughborough University (MSc). In 1995, Neil became a full time Lecturer in Exercise Physiology at Trinity and All Saints College, University of Leeds. Neil then completed a PhD in Exercise Immunology and Nutrition graduating from the University of Birmingham in 2000. Neil serves on the editorial board of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Exercise Immunology Review and Journal of Sports Sciences. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (FACSM) and contributes as a guest writer on research for Runners’ World. He has published many journal articles, co-authored a textbook in Exercise Immunology, led a highly cited position statement with the world’s leaders in exercise and stress immunology and recently co-authored a prestigious Cochrane review on hydration assessment in the elderly. Much of Neil’s recent research has been supported by the Ministry of Defence (Army), UK. This research has focused on the influence of stressors such as fluid and energy restriction and environmental stress on the immune health and performance of the Army recruit.

Email: n.walsh@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University staff profile

Research gate profile

Link to Exercise Immunology textbook!

Click on links below to download full texts of the highly cited Exercise Immunology Position Stands led by Prof Walsh.

Dr Jamie Macdonald

Jamie graduated from Bangor University in 2002 having achieved the Sarah Smythe Award and John Robert Jones prize for meritorious academic performance. After working as a freelance outdoor instructor and completing a six month worldwide climbing expedition, Jamie gained his PhD in Clinical Exercise Physiology from Bangor University in 2006. A two year post doc position within the National Health Service lead to a Lecturer post in the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences at Bangor University. Jamie now combines his passion for the outdoors with his research interests by investigating methods to improve health and performance in extreme environments and extreme sports. Specifically he has interests in high altitude physiology, and determining the physiological requirements of expeditions, rock climbing and mountain biking. Jamie has been responsible for over £250k of grant capture and continues to collaborate with the National Health Service, Science in Sport, Medical Expeditions, Outlook Expeditions, and Top of the World.

Email: j.h.macdonald@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Video biography

Jessica Mee

Jessica graduated from the University of Brighton with a BSc Hons. in Sport Science (2010) and a PhD in heat tolerance and acclimation in female athltes (2016). Alongside completing her PhD, Jessica worked part time as a teaching and research assistant at the University of Brighton. Jessica joined Bangor University in 2015 as an environmental physiology lecturer and researcher. Jessica is also a BASES accredited sport scientist, through which she has developed a range of applied experiences, typically working with female athletes to optimise their preparation for endurance races in hot climates.

Email: j.a.mee@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Research gate profile

Dr Jonathan Moore

Jonathan gained his PhD from the University of Leeds in 1994 and is a lecturer in cardiovascular physiology. Jonathan’s interests in the area of extremes research focuses on the patterns of cardiovascular adaptation to a variety of stresses. His studies include several field studies in different high-altitude dwelling populations in the Peruvian Andes and in the Ethiopian Highlands. In addition, Jonathan is interested in how humans prepare for physical activity in challenging environments. He worked for several years as a Senior Physiologist with the British Olympic Association and was responsible for assisting the National Governing Bodies of several sports to prepare their athletes for the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. More recently, Jonathan has assisted runners with their acclimatization strategies for multiday ultraendurance events in the Himalaya, as well as in the arid conditions of the Sierra Nevada in Southern Spain.

Email: j.p.moore@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Research gate profile

Dr Samuel Oliver

Sam is Deputy Head of School (Impact) and a Senior Lecturer in Exercise and Environmental Physiology. Sam’s research focuses on how human performance and health are affected by extreme environments (e.g. altitude, heat, cold, dehydration, nutrient restriction and sleep loss). Sam is currently an Associate Editor for Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism journal. Sam is also the Environmental Physiology lead for Welsh Institute of Performance Sciences that recently supported Sport Wales athletes prepare for the Commonwealth Games.

Email: s.j.oliver@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Research gate profile

Sam’s publications can be found here

Dr Julian Owen

Julian gained his PhD from the Bangor University 2015 and is a lecturer in exercise physiology. The focus of Julian’s PhD research, within the ERG, was the effect of dehydration on human performance and well-being. More recently, an emerging research theme is the development of novel biomarkers of health and performance, including their application in athlete monitoring. Prior to joining the ERG Julian worked for several years as an exercise physiologist within professional soccer, rugby union and international hockey as well as supporting institute of sport athletes.

Email: j.owen@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Research gate profile

Dr Ross Roberts

Ross completed his PhD at Bangor University in 2008 examining the effects of imagery in relation to motor performance. His research currently focuses on psychological skills and elite performance, with a particular interest in examining factors that impact on the efficacy of psychological skills in performance related contexts. A second research area is beginning to examine how biases in visual attention (as a result of hemispheric asymmetries in the brain) impact on motor performance. He has received research funding from the Wellcome Trust, the Sports Council for Wales, and the Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Network. Ross is an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society (BPS), is a chartered Sport and Exercise Psychologist with the BPS and is also accredited by BASES. He has worked with a number of high level squads (including Welsh Yachting Association, Welsh Canoe Association, Welsh Athletics Association, and the Golf Union of Wales) and athletes (professional golfers and divers).

Email: ross.roberts@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Research gate profile

Dr Gavin Lawrence

Gavin completed his PhD at Bangor University in 2005 in psychomotor behavior. Specifically, how movements are planned and controlled with and without the availability of vision. Following completion of his PhD Gavin spent two years as a Postdoctoral researcher within the Motor and Behavioral Science Research Group at the University of Leeds. Whilst there, he produced research into the mechanisms of control and disorders of co-ordination in conditions such as hemiplegic cerebral palsy and developmental coordination disorder. Recently, Gavin received funding from the European Social Fund to conduct further research into enhancing the motor skills of individuals with learning disabilities. In addition to the above, his research interests focus on skill acquisition and the attainment of expertise. Specifically, developing training to help performers succeed in stressful and anxious environments, investigating ‘what’ are the most efficacious training techniques for different extreme environments and, how movement control is effected during and as a result of exposure to different environments (i.e. hypoxic, sleep deprivation). He is a keen sports man and is passionate about applying the research within the field of Motor Control and Learning to help individuals and teams accelerate towards the attainment of expertise.

Email: g.p.lawrence@bangor.ac.uk

Bangor University profile

Research gate profile

Present PhD Students

  • Matthew Rogan. Cerebral physiology. Supervised by Paul Mullins, Jamie Macdonald and Sam Oliver
  • Daniel Hill. Physically preparing students for overseas expeditions. Supervised by Jamie Macdonald.
  • Robbie McIntyre. Rapid Heat Acclimation. Supervised by Neil Walsh and Jessica Mee.
  • Lydia Simpson. Sympathetic Activation at High Altitude. Supervised by Jonathan Moore and Sam Oliver.
  • Sophie Harrison. Predictors of Infection and Immune Function. Supervised by Neil Walsh.
  • Gabriella Rossetti. Performance and Health at Altitude. Supervised by Jamie Macdonald, Sam Oliver, and Paul Mullins.
  • Daniel Kashi. Supervised by Sam Oliver and Neil Walsh.
  • Alex Carswell. Supervised by Neil Walsh and Sam Oliver.
  • Jason Edwards. Supervised by Neil Walsh.